Catalog Help

TIPS ON USING THE FOUNTAINHEAD LIBRARY CATALOG
 
THE MAJOR SECTIONS IN THIS DOCUMENT ARE:
 
I. Using the Initial Search Screen
II. Using the Advanced Search Screen
III. Using the Results Listing
 
I. USING THE INITIAL SEARCH SCREEN.
 
Typing Terms into the Box
 
1. Case does not matter.
2. A leading 'A' or "The" (the articles) can be omitted. However, if the 'A' at the start is not the article but the name of something, be sure to include it. Example: A+ Complete.
 
Selecting and Using the Search Fields
 
Be sure to select the one you have in mind. Usually this will be Subject, Title, or Author.
 
• Choosing "Subject" is generally best if you are searching topically, exploring what is available. Type ONLY ONE WORD in the box. If you wish to use two or more words, use the Advanced Search screen instead of this one.
 
• When searching for an "Author," the only format that works is: last name, comma, first name.
 
• Choose "Title" when:
 
1. You know the title and want to determine the call number in order to locate the book on the shelf, or when you want to find out whether our library has the item.
 
2. You do not know the title, but you want to find titles with a certain word in them.
 
When using Title, the following two methods work:
 
1. Typing the exact title or some portion from the left end. For example, when searching for the book "Data Communications and Networking," you can type any of the following:
 
data communications and networking
data communications and
data communications
 
The less you type, the more titles may appear in your results list. When you are looking for a particular book, type several words FROM THE LEFT END ONLY.
 
2. Typing a single word that is (or may be) inside the title. This is useful when exploring to learn whether the library has books or other items about a topical word.
 
How is this different from using the "subject" field? Answer: The software searches the Title field instead of the Subject (related topics) field. If you do not find a book with your word in the title, try searching the subject field.
 
Call Number searching. This can only be used with the first three digits; thus, it will return all the items that start with those three numbers. This will usually be a very long list of returned items. Thus, thiis method is rarely useful in our major topical areas.
 
Year Published searching. This accepts only one year at a time, no hyphenated ranges.
 
ISBN searching. This accepts only ISBNs in the following format: 1-12-123456-1. Some ISBNs have a longer format.
 
 
II. USING THE ADVANCED SEARCH SCREEN
 
Refer to the previous section for information pertaining to selection of various Search Fields, e.g., Title, Subject, Author, and the others.
 
The advanced search provides additional search power over the basic keyword search method. Some of the things you can do here are:
 
1. Search for more than one term at a time.
 
2. Search in more than one field at a time.
 
3. Use Boolean logic operators to specify how to use the separate terms.
 
4. Sort the results list by a particular field.
 
5. Specify whether the sort will be ascending or descending. Ascending will result in alphabetical or numerical order, descending the reverse.
 
Terms
 
As with basic keyword searching:
 
• Place only one Subject term in each box;
 
• Authors names are: last name, comma, first name; and
 
• Titles must be specified from the left end.
 
Note. The visible box to the right of the word "AND" (the Boolean operator) is not available for use. Place the second term on the third line.
 
Boolean Logic Operators
 
The choices available are "AND" and "OR."
 
As logical operators, their definition is not identical with their usage in English.
 
AND is used:
 
to specify that two terms must both be present, the one to the left and the one to the right of the AND.To state this more clearly, you want to receive ONLY items in your results list that have BOTH specified words in the data (database record) about the item (book or other item).
 
Example. Specifying [ network AND security ] will cause data to appear in the results list about items who have both of these words in the data record (and within the specified fields). However, it will NOT return any items whose data records contain only one of these words.
 
A side effect of using AND is that you will tend to receive fewer results than you would by specifying only one word. This happens because it is less likely in the realm of reality to find two specific words than to find one. However, as you can see from the example, it is far better to specify both of these words when what you want is "network security" than either of them alone. (Otherwise, your results list would contain, depending on which word you specified, all the records for network topics unrelated as well as related to security, or all records referring to all other kinds of security as well to network security.)
 
(By way of comparison, when searching on the main Google page, the AND is implied and built into the software. On the other hand, in Google the OR must be inserted between the terms.
 
OR is used:
 
to specify that you will accept either of the two words alone, or both, if the latter occurs.
 
Example: [ web OR internet ] will return records of items (books, DVDs, etc.) that have "web" or "internet" or both in the record data (and within the specified fields).
 
OR is commonly used to specify alternative words with similar meaning, as above; or some other kind of alternative. For example: [ Tennessee OR Georgia ] can be used to indicate that either state is desired / acceptable.
 
A side effect of using OR, as opposed to only one term, is that you open up your chances to two terms, which tends to produce more results. This can be useful when looking for something scarce, or it can be burdensome when one or both terms are overly common.
 
III. USING THE RESULTS LISTING
 
• The most important piece of data in the listed record is probably the Call Number. This is the shelf address of the book.
 
• The results list will state, at the top, how many total records are on the list.
 
• By using the Advanced Search you can have sorted results.
 
• For each item, the following data is provided:    Title, Author, Publisher, Year Published, Call Number, and ISBN.
 
• Call Numbers are those of the Dewey Decimal System. There is an Information Mastery Topic on this website about Dewey Decimal.
 
• ISBN stands for International Standard Book Number. Every published title has a unique number. Paperback publications have a distinct number from their corresponding hard cover version.
 
• Incidentally, periodicals (magazines, newspapers, scholarly journals—anything published over and over with some time frequency) are numbered with ISSNs—International Standard Serial Numbers. (Serial is another word for periodical.) The Fountainhead Library has a small number print periodical titles.
 
Updated: 12/04/2013
12.00

TIPS ON USING THE FOUNTAINHEAD LIBRARY CATALOG


THE MAJOR SECTIONS IN THIS DOCUMENT ARE:

  I. Using the Initial Search Screen
 II. Using the Advanced Search Screen
III. Using the Results Listing

 

I. USING THE INITIAL SEARCH SCREEN.

  Typing terms into the box.  

1.       Case does not matter.

2.       A leading ‘A’ or “The” (the articles) can be omitted. However, if the ‘A’ at the start is not the article but the name of something, be sure to include it. Example:  A+ Complete.

 

  Selecting and Using the Search Fields.

  Be sure to select the one you have in mind. Usually this will be Subject, Title, or Author.

 

·         Choosing “Subject” is generally best if you are searching topically, exploring what is available. Type ONLY one word in the box. If you wish to use two or more words, use the Advanced Search screen instead of this one.

·         When searching for an “Author,” the only format that works is:  last name, comma, first name.

·         Choose “Title” when:

1.       You know the title and want to determine the call number in order to locate the book on the shelf, or when you want to find out whether our library has the item.

2.       You do not know the title, but you want to find titles with a certain word inside them.

When using Title, the following two methods work:

1.       Typing the exact title or some portion from the left end. For example, when searching for the book “Data Communications and Networking,” you can type any of the following:

                       data communications and networking
                       data communications and
                       data communications

The less you type, the more titles may appear in your results list. When you are looking for a particular book, type several words FROM THE LEFT END ONLY.

2.       Typing a single word that is (or may be) inside the title. This is useful when exploring to learn whether the library has books or other items about a topical word.

How is this different from using the “subject” field?  Answer:  The software searches the Title field instead of the Subject (related topics) field. If you do not find a book with your word in the title, try searching the subject field.

·         Call Number searching. This can only be used with the first three digits; thus, it will return all the items that start with those three numbers.

·         Year Published searching. This accepts only one year at a time, no hyphenated ranges.

 

·         ISBN searching. This accepts only ISBNs in the following format: 1-12-123456-1. Some ISBNs have 3 digits between the first and second hyphens.

II. USING THE ADVANCED SEARCH SCREEN

Refer to the previous section for information pertaining to selection of various Search Fields, e.g., Title, Subject, Author, and the others.

The advanced search provides additional search power over the basic keyword search method. Some of the things you can do here are:

1.       Search for more than one term at a time.

2.       Search in more than one field at a time.

3.       Use Boolean logic operators to specify how to use the separate terms.

4.       Sort the results list by a particular field.

5.       Specify whether the sort will be ascending or descending. Ascending will result in alphabetical or numerical order, descending the reverse.

Terms

       As with basic keyword searching:

·         Place only one Subject term in each box;

·         Authors names are: last name, comma, first name; and

·         Titles must be specified from the left end.

Note. The box to the right of the word “AND” (the Boolean operator) is not available for use. Place the second term on the third line.

Boolean Logic Operators

The choices available are “AND” and “OR.”

As logical operators, their definition is not identical with their usage in English.

AND is used:

 to specify that two terms must both be present, the one to the left and the one to the right of the AND.To state this more clearly, you want to receive ONLY items in your results list that have BOTH specified words in the data (database record) about the item (book or other item).

Example. Specifying [ network AND security ] will cause data to appear in the results list about items who have both of these words in the data record (and within the specified fields). However, it will NOT return any items whose data records contain only one of these words.

A side effect of using AND is that you will tend to receive fewer results than you would by specifying only one word. This happens because it is less likely in the realm of reality to find two specific words than to find one. However, as you can see from the example, it is far better to specify both of these words when what you want is “network security” than either of them alone. (Otherwise, your results list would contain, depending on which word you specified, all the records for network topics unrelated as well as related to security, or all records referring to all other kinds of security as well to network security.)

(By way of comparison, when searching on the main Google page, the AND is implied and built into the software. The OR, on the other hand, must be inserted between the terms. Alternatively, you can use their advanced search page.)

OR is used:

 to specify that you will accept either of the two words alone, or both, if the latter occurs.

Example:  [ web OR internet ] will return records of items (books, DVDs, etc.) that have “web” or “internet” or both in the record data (and within the specified fields).

OR is commonly used to specify alternative words with similar meaning, as above; or some other kind of alternative.  For example: [ Tennessee OR Georgia ] can be used to indicate that either state is desired / acceptable.

A side effect of using OR, as opposed to only one term, is that you open up your chances to two terms, which tends to produce more results. This can be useful when looking for something scarce, or it can be burdensome when one or both terms are overly common.

III. USING THE RESULTS LISTING

·         The most important piece of data in the listed record is probably the Call Number. This is the shelf address of the book. Media items (CDs, DVDs) are secured and must be retrieved by a librarian or Rebecca Mash.

·         The results list will state at the top, how many total records are on the list.

 

·         By using the Advanced Search you can have sorted results.

·         For each item, the following data is provided:
       Title, Author, Publisher, Year Published, Call Number, and ISBN.

·         Call Numbers are those of the Dewey Decimal System. There is Library and Information Mastery Topic about Dewey Decimal.

·         ISBN stands for International Standard Book Number. Every published title has a unique number. Paperback publications have a distinct number from their corresponding hard cover version.

·         Incidentally, periodicals (magazines, newspapers, scholarly journals—anything published over and over with some time frequency) are numbered with ISSNs—International Standard Serial Numbers. (Serial is another word for periodical.) The Fountainhead Library has print periodicals, but they are not listed in the Catalog.

 

 

 

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